Bonds’ HR Countdown!!!!!

Is their anything more durable than history? Current home run king Henry Aaron has publicly said he won’t be in attendance when Barry Bonds eventually passes him to take his place a top the all-time home run list. And though he has yet to declare it, Comissioner Bud Seligmost likely will be elsewhere also. In fact, many baseball fans will
choose to turn away when the greatest record in baseball finally falls.
Yet, no matter how many asterisks one might want to add next to Bonds’
name; no matter how many remotes decide to jump channels; no matter how
many references to HGH or steroids line the daily sports’ sections,
when Barry Bonds does finally hit  # 756, baseball HISTORY will be made!

In 1921 when Babe Ruth hit  # 139 to pass Roger Connor as the
all-time home run king, the historical impact was muted considerably
because of the infancy of the home run record. Because Ruth went on to
hit so many more long balls than Connor, the historical significance of
Connor’s home runs became even more insignificant. But like fine wine,
baseball records become so much finer with the mere passage of time. 53
years after Ruth established himself as The Sultan Of Swat, Hank Aaron
hit the most famous home run in baseball history. When Aaron hit  # 715
off of Al Downing, he not only broke Ruth’s record, but he gave the 714
home runs Ruth hit greater historical context. Ruth had set the bar.
But, until Aaron had raised it, there was no one to really compare Ruth
with. Simply, Aaron’s 715th home run meant so much to the history of
baseball because he had Ruth’s 714 home runs to build on.

Once Bonds’ reaches the new magical number, there will probably be a
frenzy of articles penned all across the country supporting the notion
that Hammering Hank should still be the rightful champion of the long
ball. But, ‘shoulds’ have never made anything so, and that is why # 756 will go down as  the most famous home-run in the annals of baseball.

Ironically, just as all the racial tension surrounding Aaron’s chase of the Babe added an extra facet to the story of # 715,
all the hoopla in the media about the possible illegitimacy of Bonds’
home-run chase, because of performance enhancing drugs, will make # 756
an even more fascinating historical event. Fans, journalists,
congressman, and even the Commissioner can opine ad nauseam on the
legitimacy of Bonds’ home run chase. But, while the opinions of many
might color history, it can never undo it. Barring injury or federal
indictment, the summer of 2007 will go down as the summer Barry Bonds
passed Hank Aaron as the all-time home run king.

         Present Home Run Total                                 Home Runs Needed

                                762                                                                Nada

 

 

Barrybonds_1

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3 comments

  1. mlblogosphere@yahoo.com

    Exactly. Actually it is going to be remembered short term as the Year of the Milestone, because we’ll have seen Biggio get 3,000, Glavine get 300 and Bonds get the most hallowed record…all in the same season. And then 5, 10 years later and it’s recorded as Bonds passing Aaron. Then the A-Rod/someone watch is on.

    Mark/MLB.com

    http://mlblogs.mlblogs.com

  2. tony@noblemusic.net

    I agree..like a bad car wreck…you want to turn away but can’t..Everyone will watch to hear the call..to see who is a naysayer and who’s a yeasayer. People seem to neglect the fact that pitchers were also juicing. I think if there is an asterisk it should be based on smaller ballparks the lower pitching mound and the juiced baseball not the juiced hitter. Barry is simply an incredible hitter and to reach this number when he has been given over 200 walks a season makes it that much more impressive. Glavine’s 300th Biggio’s 3000 and Sammy’s 500 (ESPN is sure not shying away from it.And wasn’t he the former poster boy for Steroids?) will make this an unforgettable season, although right now I think the Yankees would like to forget it.

    Tony

    Tony

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